Experiencing Awe Workshop

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April 19 @ 6:15 pm - 7:30 pm

If you missed the first session in this program series, please email carla@smithcenter.org for registration.

You will receive the Zoom information no later than the morning of your program.

with Jamie Katz

Experiencing Awe Photo by Jamie Katz
Awe in New Zealand by Jamie Katz

Experiencing Awe: 2-part Workshop

Awe is defined by Merriam Webster’s dictionary as “an emotion variously combining dread, veneration, and wonder that is inspired by authority or by the sacred or sublime”.
Awe can be broken down into two unique parts: perceived vastness and mental accommodation. Awe has the potential to create positive changes in the way a person experiences the world by making her feel a connection to something greater than herself.
In this workshop, we will watch awe-evoking videos and write about personal awe-inspiring experiences. Since awe is an emotion that can bond groups of people together, reflecting and sharing your experiences is highly encouraged. In the second session of this series, we will reframe our understanding of awe and learn to incorporate these powerful, emotional experiences into our everyday lives.

For anyone who attended Experiencing Awe last time, you are welcome to join us again, as Jamie will be offering new insights into awe.


Experiencing Awe Workshop will be offered in two parts: 

  • Part 1: Tuesday, April 12th, 6:15-7:30pm ET
  • Part 2: Tuesday, April 19th, 6:15-7:30pm ET

Suggested Donation: $20 (series)

Participants are encouraged to attend both parts to get the most out of the workshop. Please let us know in advance if you are unable to attend both parts.


About Jamie Katz

Jamie Katz
Jamie Katz is an aspiring social psychologist whose past research has focused on the effects of experiencing awe. She is a DC area native who currently works at American University, and she graduated from the University of Richmond in Virginia. Jamie will pursue a graduate degree in psychology so that she can continue to research healing practices and interventions through a deeper understanding of the brain’s processes of experiencing emotions and social connections.
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