Please email Kiersten at programs@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Carole O’Toole

A small, almost inaudible voice will say what lies ahead. By Sheila Petruccelli

Cancer often initiates an intense transformational process that can raise more questions than answers, leading us to re-examine our beliefs and approach to life. We may feel called to explore opportunities for spiritual growth, feeling a desire to connect with the sacred in a more conscious way and define more deeply life’s meaning in the face of cancer.

Regardless of your personal beliefs or faith system, working with a spiritual companion offers you an opportunity to reflect with another on what is going on for you spiritually, and explore how to integrate your cancer experience with your personal beliefs.

Spiritual Companions:

  • Provide a safe, trusting environment that invites stillness and reflection.

  • Support your spiritual growth and exploration, your unique and personal journey.

  • Listen, deeply and with compassion, honoring your sacred story. This deep listening helps you to connect with your most authentic self and illuminate your unique spiritual path.

    Suggested Donation: $15


About Carole O’Toole

Carole O'Toole

Smith Center’s Spiritual Companion, Carole O’Toole, was called to companion others following her cancer experience that led her to explore how illness offers opportunities for spiritual growth. Since 2006 Carole has served in many roles at Smith Center, including Director of Residential Retreats, Director of the Institute of Integrative Oncology Navigation, Director of Smith Center’s Integrative Navigation Training Program, and as a member of and mentor for our integrative navigation team. Carole has completed her training in Spiritual Direction from The Haden Institute, with a particular focus on grief and loss and the spiritual challenges of living with cancer.

As a Spiritual Companion, Carole believes that what is truly transformative is compassionate presence.

“Your soul already knows the way to wholeness and healing, but often speaks to us in a small, still voice. In our time together, we create a nest for your soul to rest awhile, allowing space for your sacred truth to be revealed.”

Carole invites you to explore with her how to make meaning of your cancer experience and to look for where the holy is in your life. Currently, limited space is available for new clients. Individual appointments are available via Zoom or by telephone and are free of charge.

Please email Kiersten at programs@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Carole O’Toole

A small, almost inaudible voice will say what lies ahead. By Sheila Petruccelli

Cancer often initiates an intense transformational process that can raise more questions than answers, leading us to re-examine our beliefs and approach to life. We may feel called to explore opportunities for spiritual growth, feeling a desire to connect with the sacred in a more conscious way and define more deeply life’s meaning in the face of cancer.

Regardless of your personal beliefs or faith system, working with a spiritual companion offers you an opportunity to reflect with another on what is going on for you spiritually, and explore how to integrate your cancer experience with your personal beliefs.

Spiritual Companions:

  • Provide a safe, trusting environment that invites stillness and reflection.

  • Support your spiritual growth and exploration, your unique and personal journey.

  • Listen, deeply and with compassion, honoring your sacred story. This deep listening helps you to connect with your most authentic self and illuminate your unique spiritual path.


About Carole O’Toole

Carole O'Toole

Smith Center’s Spiritual Companion, Carole O’Toole, was called to companion others following her cancer experience that led her to explore how illness offers opportunities for spiritual growth. Since 2006 Carole has served in many roles at Smith Center, including Director of Residential Retreats, Director of the Institute of Integrative Oncology Navigation, Director of Smith Center’s Integrative Navigation Training Program, and as a member of and mentor for our integrative navigation team. Carole has completed her training in Spiritual Direction from The Haden Institute, with a particular focus on grief and loss and the spiritual challenges of living with cancer.

As a Spiritual Companion, Carole believes that what is truly transformative is compassionate presence.

“Your soul already knows the way to wholeness and healing, but often speaks to us in a small, still voice. In our time together, we create a nest for your soul to rest awhile, allowing space for your sacred truth to be revealed.”

Carole invites you to explore with her how to make meaning of your cancer experience and to look for where the holy is in your life. Currently, limited space is available for new clients. Individual appointments are available via Zoom or by telephone and are free of charge.

Please email Kiersten at programs@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Carole O’Toole

A small, almost inaudible voice will say what lies ahead. By Sheila Petruccelli

Cancer often initiates an intense transformational process that can raise more questions than answers, leading us to re-examine our beliefs and approach to life. We may feel called to explore opportunities for spiritual growth, feeling a desire to connect with the sacred in a more conscious way and define more deeply life’s meaning in the face of cancer.

Regardless of your personal beliefs or faith system, working with a spiritual companion offers you an opportunity to reflect with another on what is going on for you spiritually, and explore how to integrate your cancer experience with your personal beliefs.

Spiritual Companions:

  • Provide a safe, trusting environment that invites stillness and reflection.

  • Support your spiritual growth and exploration, your unique and personal journey.

  • Listen, deeply and with compassion, honoring your sacred story. This deep listening helps you to connect with your most authentic self and illuminate your unique spiritual path.


About Carole O’Toole

Carole O'Toole

Smith Center’s Spiritual Companion, Carole O’Toole, was called to companion others following her cancer experience that led her to explore how illness offers opportunities for spiritual growth. Since 2006 Carole has served in many roles at Smith Center, including Director of Residential Retreats, Director of the Institute of Integrative Oncology Navigation, Director of Smith Center’s Integrative Navigation Training Program, and as a member of and mentor for our integrative navigation team. Carole has completed her training in Spiritual Direction from The Haden Institute, with a particular focus on grief and loss and the spiritual challenges of living with cancer.

As a Spiritual Companion, Carole believes that what is truly transformative is compassionate presence.

“Your soul already knows the way to wholeness and healing, but often speaks to us in a small, still voice. In our time together, we create a nest for your soul to rest awhile, allowing space for your sacred truth to be revealed.”

Carole invites you to explore with her how to make meaning of your cancer experience and to look for where the holy is in your life. Currently, limited space is available for new clients. Individual appointments are available via Zoom or by telephone and are free of charge.

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Individual Dramatherapy Work

Individual Dramatherapy

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University. 

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Individual Dramatherapy Work

Individual Dramatherapy

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University. 

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Individual Dramatherapy Work

Individual Dramatherapy

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University. 

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Individual Dramatherapy Work

Individual Dramatherapy

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University. 

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Individual Dramatherapy Work

Individual Dramatherapy

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University. 

Please email Carla at carla@smithcenter.org for further information about the program.

with Jodi Kanter

Come explore a new Smith Center one-on-one offering where drama and a therapeutic approach to healing come together.

 

Drama therapy is the art of the possible. It can help us to rewrite old scripts for interacting with the people around us. It can allow us to take less developed parts of ourselves and transform them into robust roles in our own life-dramas. And it can provide concrete ways of imagining—and rehearsing—the future we want to make happen for ourselves.

 

In your initial session with Jodi, you will explore the roles you already play comfortably and identify those you’d most like to develop.

If after our initial session you would like to continue, sessions 2, 3, and 4 will consist of exercises that allow you to better understand and embody these less familiar parts of yourself.

 

Additionally, Jodi is available to offer a second set of four sessions, focused on working with more specific content from your own life story.


About Jodi Kanter

Jodi has been involved in theater since she was ten years old. She grew up acting and studying performance in American theater’s “Second City,” Chicago Illinois.  She is currently a professor of theatre in the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at George Washington University, where she has been on faculty for nearly fifteen years. Her academic work in theater includes her book, Performing Loss: Strengthening Communities Through Theatre and Writing (2007). Jodi’s focus on performance as a tool for individual and social healing and change has led her to create workshops, events and productions in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, schools, and prisons. Most recently, she co-created a four-month diversity and inclusion program for members of DC’s fourteen Neighborhood Village associations using the methodology of Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Jodi holds a PhD. in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in dramatherapy at Lesley University.